Hells Kitchen Nyc

Hells Kitchen Nyc

Hell’s Kitchen is a NYC neighborhood; therefore it teems with transportation options. The Port Authority Bus Terminal serves as the end terminal for interstate buses, and seven NYC bus routes run through the neighborhood, heading off in all directions. Three subway stations along Eighth Avenue provide easy access to the A, C and E lines, connecting residents to Washington Heights, Queens, Brooklyn, and the Financial District. In addition, those wishing to leave Manhattan can head for Penn Station just south of Hell’s Kitchen or take a cruise leaving from the cruise ship terminal on the Hudson River. Many residents walk to work or to run errands, and bicycling remains an option for the courageous on the congested city streets. Taxis ply the major thoroughfares, with Uber or car services just a phone call away. The Lincoln Tunnel opens out in Hell’s Kitchen, ready to take people to and from New Jersey.
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Hells Kitchen Nyc

Landlubbers can enjoy the coastal scenery at Hudson River Park. This miles-long stretch of Manhattan waterfront contains spectacles for every onlooker, from the naturalist to the skyline lover. The establishment of the park in 1998 also played a key role in the transformation of Hell's Kitchen from den of iniquity into hub of activity. Consider exploring the park via the NYC Greenway bike path, first by renting a two-wheeler at Bike and Roll at Pier 84. This is a great way to explore Hell's Kitchen overall, because the neighborhood boasts multiple bike lanes, as well as places to park and stretch. One rest stop is De Witt Clinton Park, whose six acres include children's play space, dog runs, Maria's Perennial Garden and sports fields—where pickup games of basketball or handball might prevent you from resting much at all.
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Hells Kitchen Nyc

The precise origins of Hell’s Kitchen’s trouble-stirring moniker are unclear, but they undoubtedly arose from its emergence as an Irish-mob-dominated neighborhood in the 19th century. Today, the area is becoming the city’s queer hot spot—it’s the site of about a dozen gay watering holes and New York’s first luxury “straight-friendly” hotel, The Out NYC, which houses the sprawling XL Nightclub, Cabaret & Lounge. Ninth Avenue’s constantly shifting array of multiethnic eateries draws theatergoers who shun Times Square’s tourist traps. As gentrification takes hold, new apartment blocks are springing up in the former wasteland near the Hudson River—and development will kick into overdrive when the long-delayed mixed-use complex Hudson Yards and the last phase of the High Line finally come to fruition.
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Hells Kitchen Nyc

The precise origins of Hell’s Kitchen’s trouble-stirring moniker are unclear, but they undoubtedly arose from its emergence as an Irish-mob-dominated neighborhood in the 19th century. Today, the area is becoming the city’s queer hot spot—it’s the site of about a dozen gay watering holes and New York’s first luxury “straight-friendly” hotel, The Out NYC, which houses the sprawling XL Nightclub, Cabaret & Lounge. Ninth Avenue’s constantly shifting array of multiethnic eateries draws theatergoers who shun Times Square’s tourist traps. As gentrification takes hold, new apartment blocks are springing up in the former wasteland near the Hudson River—and development will kick into overdrive when the long-delayed mixed-use complex Hudson Yards and the last phase of the High Line finally come to fruition.RECOMMENDED: Full guide of Manhattan, NY
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Hells Kitchen Nyc

Outdoors Going aboard the Intrepid is a must-do, ranking alongside an elevator ride to the top of the Empire State Building in terms of singular NYC experiences. The 1943 aircraft carrier has hosted the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum since 1982, after doing tours of duty in World War II and Vietnam. Besides teaching about the vessel itself, a tour through the museum includes stops at aircraft and exhibits that narrate wartime history and the heroic service performed by military and civilians. If you want to make like the Intrepid and float in the Hudson River yourself, then head to Pier 96, where swimming is permitted, albeit only as part of events organized by the Manhattan Island Foundation; in other words, schedule carefully.
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Hells Kitchen Nyc

Experience New York City like an insider on this action-packed VIP tour that includes early access to the Empire State Building, skip-the-line entry to the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum, an open-top bus tour, and a hop-on-hop-off cruise. You can upgrade to also include afternoon admission to the 9/11 Museum. Seem like a lot to do in one day? Opt to take your cruise the following day. It’s a great way to see NYC’s newest sites and its most iconic attractions, and a Viator exclusive package that can’t be booked anywhere else!
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Hells Kitchen Nyc

Walkable Historic Parks Arts Dining Upscale Trendy The name “Hell’s Kitchen” conjures up some pretty unsavory connotations, but the neighborhood moniker is a leftover from many decades past; since the early 1980s, Hell’s Kitchen has undergone substantial improvements, and today it is considered one of the safest and most in-demand areas of the city (image-conscious residents sometimes refer to this area as “Clinton”). Today, Hell’s Kitchen is defined by upscale new and refurbished residential buildings, though rental rates are still quite competitive for Manhattan. A vibrant collective of restaurants, bars, and art centers cater to the eclectic tastes of the locals. Numerous public parks are spread throughout the community, particularly the large De Witt Clinton Park near the waterfront, and Central Park is very close at hand as well. Midtown Manhattan’s endless array of attractions is just a couple of blocks away from anywhere in Hell’s Kitchen, and Penn Station is one of several convenient subway stops in and near the neighborhood to get you around the city with ease.
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Hells Kitchen Nyc

The name “Hell’s Kitchen” conjures up some pretty unsavory connotations, but the neighborhood moniker is a leftover from many decades past; since the early 1980s, Hell’s Kitchen has undergone substantial improvements, and today it is considered one of the safest and most in-demand areas of the city (image-conscious residents sometimes refer to this area as “Clinton”). Today, Hell’s Kitchen is defined by upscale new and refurbished residential buildings, though rental rates are still quite competitive for Manhattan. A vibrant collective of restaurants, bars, and art centers cater to the eclectic tastes of the locals. Numerous public parks are spread throughout the community, particularly the large De Witt Clinton Park near the waterfront, and Central Park is very close at hand as well. Midtown Manhattan’s endless array of attractions is just a couple of blocks away from anywhere in Hell’s Kitchen, and Penn Station is one of several convenient subway stops in and near the neighborhood to get you around the city with ease.
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Once a bastion of poor and working class Irish Americans, Hell’s Kitchen’s location in Midtown has changed its personality since the 1970s. Though Hell’s Kitchen’s gritty reputation had long held real-estate prices below those of most other areas of Manhattan, by 1969, the City Planning Commission’s Plan for New York City reported that development pressures related to its Midtown location were driving people of modest means from the area. Since the early 1990s, the area has been gentrifying, and rents have risen rapidly. Located close to both Broadway theaters and the Actors Studio training school, Hell’s Kitchen has long been a home to learning and practicing actors, in addition, in recent years, to young Wall Street financiers.
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Culture Many visitors happen on to Hell's Kitchen pre- or post-theater, because the neighborhood is immediately adjacent to Broadway. The Theatre District spirit thrives within Hell's Kitchen, too, thanks to countless Off-Broadway venues where experimental drama and future blockbusters thrill audiences. A consistently bright star in this constellation is Ars Nova, whose programming more than makes up for a less central location. The not-for-profit was founded in 2002 to nurture emerging voices in comedy, music and theater, and the shows featured on its intimate stage regularly garner praise. Just as Ars Nova runs the gamut of performing arts, so does Hell's Kitchen. After drama, dance is a neighborhood specialty, thanks in part to the presence of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater at the Joan Weill Center for Dance. Alvin Ailey founded the company in 1958 to celebrate African-American culture and modern dance in America, and it has occupied New York's largest building dedicated to dance since the facility's completion in 2005. That year also marked Mikhail Baryshnikov's launch of the Baryshnikov Arts Center (BAC) on the top three floors of a mid-rise that also houses the Orchestra of St. Luke's DiMenna Center for Classical Music. BAC presents dance, music and other shows in spring and fall seasons in its Jerome Robbins Theater and Howard Gilman Performance Space, and it supports artists in residence year-round.
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HELL’S KITCHEN: A beloved neighborhood with a little grit. Named for the notorious 19th century motorcycle gang, “Hell’s Kitchen” was once a part of town where few New Yorkers thought to live. Its gritty reputation and far-west location kept it under the radar. But today’s Hell’s Kitchen is a far cry from the image its name evokes. In the past ten years, developers and small business owners have planted roots in this up-and-coming neighborhood.