Kitchen Window Trim

Kitchen Window Trim

John Maniscalco Architecture 3. RevealsA thin shadowed line surrounding the window frame describes another contemporary approach to window trim. This one acknowledges the difference between window and wall but ever so subtly. Reveals can be created by using different extruded trims at the edges of the Sheetrock surrounding the window. These trims come in various widths and are fabricated from either metal or vinyl by manufacturers like Pittcon, Fry Reglet and Trim-tex. The reveal enables one to achieve a planar look to the wall without the added dimension of trim protruding outward. It’s a thoroughly modern aesthetic that quietly showcases the window frame as an opening, without the fussiness and associated stylistic hang-ups of trim. The Sheetrock finishing costs are higher with this type of treatment, but if it’s a tailored modern look you’re after, this is for you.
kitchen window trim 1

Kitchen Window Trim

3. RevealsA thin shadowed line surrounding the window frame describes another contemporary approach to window trim. This one acknowledges the difference between window and wall but ever so subtly. Reveals can be created by using different extruded trims at the edges of the Sheetrock surrounding the window. These trims come in various widths and are fabricated from either metal or vinyl by manufacturers like Pittcon, Fry Reglet and Trim-tex. The reveal enables one to achieve a planar look to the wall without the added dimension of trim protruding outward. It’s a thoroughly modern aesthetic that quietly showcases the window frame as an opening, without the fussiness and associated stylistic hang-ups of trim. The Sheetrock finishing costs are higher with this type of treatment, but if it’s a tailored modern look you’re after, this is for you.
kitchen window trim 2

Kitchen Window Trim

Prentiss Balance Wickline Architects Facing the view and the harsh winter winds, this room is both light and open, but also confidently structured. You sense the space’s ability to resist the rugged site’s forces, with a heavy floor and well-proportioned, closely spaced columns. The module of construction is dictated by the fir posts, and each window assembly fits precisely within the structural bay. The crisp dark steel is bridged by a thin band of wood linking the window back to the structure.Paring down the window trim to a very thin band reinforces the window’s place in the order of the exterior wall (subservient to the structure), while allowing maximum light into the space and preserving the delicate nature of the windows. Thick window trim would’ve undermined this intentional and mannered approach to the window openings.
kitchen window trim 3

Kitchen Window Trim

Facing the view and the harsh winter winds, this room is both light and open, but also confidently structured. You sense the space’s ability to resist the rugged site’s forces, with a heavy floor and well-proportioned, closely spaced columns. The module of construction is dictated by the fir posts, and each window assembly fits precisely within the structural bay. The crisp dark steel is bridged by a thin band of wood linking the window back to the structure.Paring down the window trim to a very thin band reinforces the window’s place in the order of the exterior wall (subservient to the structure), while allowing maximum light into the space and preserving the delicate nature of the windows. Thick window trim would’ve undermined this intentional and mannered approach to the window openings.
kitchen window trim 4

Kitchen Window Trim

Projects more than 1/8 in. If the drywall projects more than 1/8 in., crush in the drywall with a hammer. Just be sure the crushed area will be covered by trim. In this situation, your miters won’t be 45 degrees. You may need to go as low as 44 degrees to get a tight miter. Projects less than 1/8 in. If the drywall projects past the jamb 1/8 In. or less, and is close to the window jamb, just chamfer the edge with a utility knife. Check to see if you’ve pared off enough drywall by holding a chunk of trim against the drywall and jamb. If it rocks and won’t sit flush against both surfaces, carve out some more. Drywall too low If the drywall’s recessed behind the jamb, don’t nail the trim to the framing at first. Only nail it to the jamb and pin the mitered corners together. After the window is trimmed, slide shims behind each nail location to hold out the trim while nailing, then cut off the shims. Caulk the perimeter of the trim to eliminate gaps before painting.
kitchen window trim 5

Kitchen Window Trim

Architects often think about projects in terms of systems. It’s one of our strategies for organizing the complexities of construction into a coherent whole. Each system has an order and interfaces with the other building components in a clear way. Windows have a special place in our systems. They help to define site connections, permit or screen views, and modulate natural light entering our spaces. When thinking about how window systems integrate into the larger structure, I like to develop a clear logic that describes how they’re placed in walls, which always requires adopting an attitude toward trim. Trim is a standard vehicle for hiding joints where materials come together — the edges of Sheetrock are a good example. Trim can also set a building in a particular time period.But to me, the more integrated even a small detail such as trim is with an idea about a place or structure, the more it can support the overall logic of a building. The following projects eschew traditional ideas about trim in service of a bigger, modern idea.
kitchen window trim 6

Kitchen Window Trim

Step One // How to Trim Out a Window Trimming Out a Window When installing window casing inold houses, Tom often has to contend with walls that dip and bulge, causing gaps between the trim and wall. He can’t ignore these impoerfections, but he doesn’t fill them with caulk. Instead, Tom uses wood filler strips. “I like to leave a nice clean edge for the painter,” he says. To make them, he first rips a scrap piece of casing to a width of 1 inch and as long as the casing is high. He sets the legs of a compass to span the largest wall-to-casing gap (as shown in “Fill in the Gap” 1, far left). He then transfers that distance to the face of the scrap wood (as shown in “Fill in the Gap” 2). Next, he places the strip perpendicular to the casing at its outside edge, resets the compass to the distance between the largest gap and the mark on the scrap, and scribes the profile of the wall onto the scrap piece (as shown in “Fill in the Gap” 3). After cutting along that line with a jigsaw, he applies carpenter’s glue to the profiled scrap piece and slides it into the gap so wall and trim marry perfectly (as shown in “Fill in the Gap” 4). “With a light sanding and paint, the joint disappears,” Tom says. Click “enlarge this image” to view illustration labels.
kitchen window trim 7

Kitchen Window Trim

Avoiding Trim-induced Headaches Here are a few tips to help you avoid a few trim hassles: Whenever you can, cut with the thick side of the trim against the miter saw fence. You’ll be less likely to tear out the narrow tapered edge that way. Cutting right up to the pencil mark almost always leaves pieces too long, so remove the pencil line with the blade. You’ll most likely still have to shave off more. Sneak up on cuts by starting long and dipping the saw blade into the wood while you work your way to the cutoff mark. Trim out the biggest windows first. That way, you can reuse miscuts for the smaller windows and not run out of material. When nailing 3/4-in.-thick trim, use 15-gauge 2-1/2-in. nails for the framing and 18-gauge 2-in. brads for nailing to the jamb. To prevent splitting, avoid nailing closer than 2 in. from the ends.
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Step Three // How to Trim Out a Window Cut and Rabbet the Stool Place a side casing against the wall, aligned with the reveal line on a side jamb. Mark the wall at the casing’s outside edge. Repeat for the opposite jamb. Measure between the marks, add 2 inches, and cut the stool to this length. Place the stool face down on the sill with its back edge against the sill trim. Mark where the top of the trim meets the stool’s end. Keeping the back corner against the sill trim, slide the end of the upside-down stool against the jamb. Make a vertical mark where the end of the stool touches the jamb. Connect the two marks with a square and make an X in the area defined by the lines; this is the waste that will be cut out to make the rabbet. Remove the waste in two separate rip cuts on a table saw.
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One down, three to go!

Next up is the garden window in the kitchen… Same exact method. Sill, sides, bottom, top. It’s really as easy as it looks. The window over the future sink… And finally, the dining area window. The bottom piece was a little bowed (common with this wood) so we clamped it down before nailing it to the wall. All done! The next day, I came back to fill all of the nail holes and deal with one more problem—the textured walls. Some areas were worse than others, but I wanted a nice smooth look so it’s not obvious that the insides of the window are drywall and not wood. Doug the handyman was there and let me borrow his drywall mud and go crazy. I figured I’d put a coat or two up and make the seams less obvious (most people would use caulk, but I wanted to skim coat the drywall to hide the texture so I killed two birds with one stone). The kitchen drywall texture was the worst. The wall was also nowhere near straight, so I had to put a few coats on this one to try and even it all out. This step is not necessary (especially if you have smoother walls) but I’m really trying to pay attention to detail with this house. I don’t want to have to go back and red o anything later on. I also added a few light coats over some of the more visible knots. Not sure how drywall mud will work out but I figured it couldn’t hurt. And that’s where we’re at now! I plan to sand and caulk everything on Sunday so it’s ready for paint. I’m choosing my paint color carefully this time—after we make an Ikea trip (hopefully next weekend) and get our pantry and bench seating, I want to color match the whites so the room looks cohesive. In other news, I’ve been keeping my eye out for home decor and seriously scored last week. Check out what I got for $24! My treasures include two vintage glass window panes and small doors, an antique sled and paddle, pretty white dishes, antlers, two quilts, wood trays, a stool, 4 suitcases, a dremel kit, kitchen jars and canisters, and a large collection of glass insulators and more. Most of it was actually free from an abandoned garage my parents inherited from their tenants, and the rest was picked up at a local flea market. I can’t wait to start decorating! But first we must get through the next few weeks of hard work. Brad has been at the house every day working on the home theater room and is anxious to share his progress, so that will be coming in the next post!